MILITARY
PLATEEXPLANATION
3BROS SFI'm thinking that this maybe translates to "Three Brothers [in] Special Forces" -- which represents quite an accomplishment for that family...
3RDUSINFEasy to figure this one out: 3rd US Infantry [Division]
12an EXTREMELY rare specialty plate, I did a double take when this vehicle passed me!!! These plates are so rare, they are not even publicly listed as an available option on North Carolina's Department of Transportation Web site under Specialty Plates: The symbol on the left side of the plate noted: MEDAL OF HONOR. Wow, a true hero, or the family thereof!
08 USMA2008 graduate of the US Military Academy (i.e., West Point)
1LTJOICE1st Lieutenant Joice
2RNGERS=62 Rangers = 6 [regular soldiers"?] perhaps? Not sure...seen on a plate while crossing the Smoky Mtn. from North Carolina into Tennessee
2IRQVETS2 Iraq Vets--husband and wife, both deployed at one time or other? Just a guess...
A6M3ZEROThis plate owner is a fan of the WWII Japanese Mitsubishi ZERO fighter (aircraft), the designation of which was "A6M" (this was the Imperial Japanese Navy's aircraft carrier model). Thanks to Randy W. for this puppy...
ABN124 This was a West Virginia plate. Airborne (ABN)--not sure of the number's significance, if other than just a count of the number of plates with ABN...
ABN CW4 Airborne (ABN) qualified Chief Warrant Officer 4th grade
ABNCHAZZ Not sure what the CHAZZ part refers to...(I was a tanker, myself, i.e., an Armor guy, so don't know any Airborne term specifics...)
ABN4025Seen on an Arizona plate...but "ABN" is not the number/letter configuration for a standard Arizona passenger plate, so it appears to be Vanity (and ABN4024 and ABN 4023 were also unavailable on an Arizona vanity plate search--meaning already "in use")
ABN9075Airborne, but not sure of the significance of the number in this case...
ABNGRL82This "airborne girl" was probably BORN in 1982, or else she's either retired, or a vet who signed up in '82...
ABN INFAirborne Infantry -- which translates to either paratroopers (parachutes)- 82nd Airborne -- or air transported (helicopter), which could be the 82nd (some units), or the 101st (which doesn't use parachute troop deliveries anymore)... .
ABN-MOM You can figure this one out!
ABNTIGRGuess this person is reflecting on his/her military service in the 82nd Airborne Div., and his/her prowess at the same time (or else it's just someone who likes jumping from aircraft and considers himself/herself a "tiger" ; Thanks to Randy W. for this plate...
ABNUSAirborne, US soldier, or Airborne, United States.
AH64This plate's owner is apparently involved with Army helicopters in some fashion since "AH-64" is the designation for an Apache attack chopper. 2 kewl!!
AIR CAVAirborne Cavalry means cavalry soldiers (part of the ARMOR branch) who are delivered to their combat areas by helicopter, and the pilots and aircrews that service these machines. In the US Army, ARMOR branch has two parallel "tracks" (1) Straight Armor (tanks only) and (2) Cavalry. Cavalry includes ground cav and air cav. If cav soldiers (not counting the vehicle personnel and pilots) go to air assault school, they can join the 101st Airborne (Air Assault). Infantry troops can also attend Air Assault school, but their basic branch remains Infantry. Ground cav may be a combined tank/mech infantry team (M1 tanks and tracked M2/M3 Bradley fighting vehicles), or a Stryker (wheeled armored vehicle) unit. Ground cav units are most often employed today as recon forces, or as scouts. The air cav units on the other hand, are helicopter units that deliver their troops by helicopter to wherever the mission is tasked, and also include combat helicopters (Apaches). Cav units traditionally use different terminology than the rest of the Army. For the Cavalry, a Battalion-sized unit is known as a "Squadron," and a Company-sized unit is a "Troop." The air cav saw extensive use in the Vietnam war.
ARANGERA ranger (I'm assuming this means the Army type of Ranger, as opposed to the Forestry Service type, Texas type, or... a POWER RANGER!)... .
ARMY 128 No doubt about which service this person served (or currently serves) in...
ARMY CID Interesting -- this driver is apparently a member of the Army version of NCIS -- i.e., the US Army Criminal Investigation Command United States Army Criminal Investigation Command (Wikipedia: USACIDC, usually abbreviated as just CID), which was created in WWI as the Criminal Investigation Division (hence the D in CID, left for continuity; technically, it should be the "CIC"); thanks to Randy W. for this one!
ARMY-FAM Putting this one in two categories (family and military). Pretty straightforward: Army Family ...this plate kindly provided by Randy W.
ARTY Either a nickname for a guy named Arthur--or the abbreviated form of the word ARTILLERY...
BUGEATERAn old-school nickname for a Special Forces soldier (Green Berets) since they are trained to be able to partake of anything edible (lots of protein in insects) while in the field on a mission; see SN8KEATR below for another one. Thanks to Randy W. for this one...
C5 CHIEFI'm guessing here, but I think maybe this is a Chief Warrant Officer 5 (or maybe, it's some sort of vehicle?)...
CDR Commander (of some unit). In the Army, this could be a Company CDR (usually a Captain), Battalion CDR (Lieutenant Colonel), Regiment/Brigade CDR (Colonel), or a Division Commander (Major General)
CMB MED This one I read as COMBAT MEDIC, like the next one below.
CMBTMEDCSelf-explanatory (combat medic); Note: in the Navy, medically trained sailors who go ashore into combat along with the Marines are called "corpsman," rather than "medic"...
CPT AMRII'm assuming this is the rank of Captain (CPT, in Army-style abbreviation; Navy, Air Force and Marines use "Capt."), along with the driver's family name...
CURRAHEECurrahee mountain is located in the state of Georgia. It was next to Camp Toccoa, which served as a training base for the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment of the 101st Airborne Division prior to WWII. The mountain was made famous in the Band of Brothers HBO series due to the physical challenges presented by running up it (it reaches 1,735 feet), and back. This driver is probably either a military fan or perhaps a 101st Airborne vet. Thanks to Randy W. for this plate.
DDAY1944Awesome! This individual chose to commemorate this remarkably fateful day in history... .
E-9This is a rank: Enlisted grade 9, which is the highest Army enlisted pay grade/rank: SERGEANT MAJOR (SGM). A SGM is the senior non-commissioned officer at Battalion, or Brigade level--i.e., the battalion or brigade commander's senior enlisted soldier/advisor. If you make E-9, then you've essentially reached the pinnacle of the enlisted pyramid--and this deserves to be touted!
FLITEDOC Physician for flyers--a cross listing from the "employment" category, because it's probably a military flight doc...
GI JOE82 On a Virginia plate. GI Joe (so an Army fellow), and in the 82nd Airborne Division, most likely. ... .
GI-BLUES No trouble with this one...
GI-MD Either a military doctor (doctor for GI's, or a doctor who IS IN the military), or else a Gastro-Intestinal doctor (GI tract MD) not connected with the military--there's no way to tell... .
HEAD 2-FT "Head to fight," perhaps (i.e., heading off to where the fighting is)? In the absence of other clues, I am assuming this is military, but I could be totally off-base (no pun intended...). "Head 2-foot"? (i.e., the 'boss' 2 foot? (i.e., man, as opposed to 4-foot?)...Thanks to Randy W.
HOPLITEI am a historian and I love studying both the Roman Army (Exercitus Romanorum)--i.e.,the legions--and the armies of the many independent Greek city states. A Roman legion was formed from 10 COHORS "cohorts," each Cohors being 6 CENTURIAE "centuries" (except the 1st Cohort, which had double centuries); the century in turn, was formed from the basic 8-man tent group known as a CONTUBURNIUM. Ten contuburnia formed 1 century (about 80 men).

All the Greek armies, on the other hand, fought primarily in the more inflexible (but heavy shock power) infantry formation known as a "phalanx" (with cavalry in support); basic equipment was a helmet, a sword, a very long spear, and a round, convex shield called a "hoplon"--from which the name of Greek infantry soldiers (regardless of which city state) was derived: "HOPLITE".
I thought this vanity plate was especially cool, since this person clearly knew his ancient history! The pickup bearing the plate was parked on an Army base--what do you want to bet, that the owner is an infantryman--a modern day HOPLITE, so to speak?

IMUSARETEasy enough to figure this one out...
LDR 1Leader 1 (perhaps this individual is the 1st Platoon leader?)
LEADERSelf-explanatory--though this could also be a civilian business leader, as well...
LVMYSLDR Almost certain the wife of a military person is the owner of this plate (though it could be a soldier's Mom). If you're having trouble making sense of it, here it is in full, but reversed: (reidlos ym evol)
M1 ARMORIt's safe to assume this is either an Armor guy, or a fan of Armor (tanks), since an M1 is the Army's latest fielded main batte tank, and Armor is the Army occupational branch (19E) that tankers are assigned to; my first job was as a US Army Armor officer so I am myself a "treadhead" at heart...Seen on a black Corvette; thanks to Randy W. for this one...
MAJ-RETRetired Major, though not sure which service the Major was in; know only that it was not the US Navy...
MRS.MILSomeone married to a military person? Thanks to Randy W...
MY USMCClearly a Marine aficionado/member (or veteran) of the Marine Corps. Thanks to Randy W. in NC.
NOT-A-LEGWhen so many forms of Airborne references, e.g., ABN, US ABN, etc. have been tied up already, Airborne soldiers need to be creative in finding ways to show they are elite--a cut above NON-airborne infantry (regular non-mechanized infantry guys have long held the nickname "leg infantry" because they walk everywhere. So, by indicating he is NOT a leg, this guy implies that he is Airborne, thus, a member of the 'elite'...
OA 1SGTthe rank is 1st SGT (First Sergeant)--the senior NCO (nicknamed "Top") of a company-sized unit. The meaning of the "OA" remains a question...
PARATRPRAnother word for an Airborne Infantryman: Paratrooper -- or as the Germans say: Fallschirmjäger (parachute hunter).
RET-ARMY retired Army veteran...
RETSFCSM This is a neat plate! Retired Special Forces Command Sergeant Major!
RME WYFPeople are truly clever at finding alternative methods of saying things! Many options having likely already been taken, this woman opted for this method--unique, and effective...~! Thanks to Randy W. for plate.
RNGR2 Also an Army RANGER (as in Ranger TOO)? Or, the third RANGER plate (RNGR, RNGR1...)--or, a Power Ranger fan...
SFSGMD/DSpecial Forces (SF) Sergeant Major (SGM). The "D" could be a name initial, or might stand for "Detachment" (Special Forces unit sizes include "Detachments") -- the remainder "/D", is uncertain...
SGT 9 ELT"SGT" is the Army-style abbreviation form for the rank of E-5, "Sergeant;" an E-9 grade is a SERGEANT MAJOR (see earlier explanation). There is obviously more than one SGM on any given army base, but since state auto registration departments only allow 1 owner for any given plate number, these soldiers have to be especially creative when figuring an alternate means of displaying their rank. The original "SGM," or "E-9" plates were already claimed (see "E-9" above), so this fellow opted for Sergeant + 9 (i.e., E-9) + ELT--the last probably being his initials. Thus, "Sergeant 9 (=Sergeant Major) ELT"
SGT KOZSergeant Koz; a (3-stripe) "buck" Sergeant is an E-5 (Enlisted grade-5).
SN8KEATRThis is the "old school" term used in the past by Special Forces personnel to refer to themselves (Snake Eater)
SKYSAPPRInteresting plate using an old-timer military term together with "AIR;" a "SAPPER" was either (1) A military specialist in field fortifications (combat engineer), or (2) A military specialist in demolitions (could also mean an Explosive Ordnance Disposal tech). Thus, an Airborne (1) or (2)...
SOUJABOYNeat way to get nearly the pronunciation you would get with the correct spelling...Or, this might be some sort of musical group...
SPTTDon't know what the abbreviation represents, but it was seen on a North Carolina "BS" specialty plate (Bronze Star award). Thanks ro Randy W. for this...
SSG=LOVEStaff Sergeant (the usual abbreviation in the military)=LOVE? Odd...
TANKRWYFWife of a Tanker (ARMOR/Cavalry branch soldier)
TOPThe Army nickname used for a company 1st SGT
USN 7This has got to mean the driver is, or was, a "squid" (slang name for Navy personnel as used by NON-Navy personnel; can be insulting, or affectionate--hey, I was in the Army, but my Dad was a squid, so I've got nothing against the Navy; in fact, I was a US Naval Sea Cadet in High School and I applied to the US Naval Academy [Annapolis], but got nominated as 3rd alternate to the Air Force Academy--my 3rd choice--and opted instead for Army ROTC)...
USNDIVER Navy diver
USMAUS Military Academy (West Point)...
USMA981998 graduate of the US Military Academy?...
USNA 70Probably a 1970 graduate--this time, of the US Naval Academy (Annapolis)
USNDIVERUS Navy diver...
USMCNo doubt about which Service holds this driver's loyalty. The USMC was on a North Carolina specialty plate, with the vertically stacked specialty code letters "C" over "U"
USSGMAnother Sergeant Major finds an alternate way to personalize his plate: US Sergeant Major
VET VET2Veteran of military service -- not sure why the VET was doubled--unless the person served in two different branches (i.e., Air Force, then Army)...
WARHORSEThis plate was on a big, black pickup truck--A knight's steed in day's of old was often referred to as a War horse--I like the reference here!
WARTRPHYThis plate was also on a big, black pickup truck--which the owner probably used combat pay benefits to pay for--hence WAR TROPHY.

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